The Clarion

Reviewing the myths and facts about nation’s obesity crisis

Myths and facts about obesity.

MCT

Myths and facts about obesity.

Jacki Brickner, Opinion Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






There is a nationwide crisis with obesity in the United States. From negatively stereotyping overweight individuals, to body shaming what some people consider to be weight outside the norm, it can be difficult to sort through the facts and myths about obesity that permeate our society.

First let’s debunk the most common myth behind obesity. It is a myth that all people overweight are just lazy. While this may be true for some, there are a myriad of factors that may contribute to obesity. They include stress, socioeconomic status, geographical location and genetics. Chalking it all up to being lazy is ignorant.

By removing biases and truly understanding obesity, we can make people understand that it is a chronic condition and should be treated as such.

At Madison College, students have several resources to help them be their best selves. We have, but are not limited to, a gymnasium, a swimming pool, intramural recreation opportunities, and a fitness center. We also have a quiet room where you can go if you need to breathe, meditate or relax.

With obesity being such a complex issue, with many underlying causes people must realize there is more to it then just not working out.

The questions of why you are eating so much, or why you don’t feel the motivation to get up and get moving are also important. The causes can range from thyroid issues to emotional eating. Just because someone is bigger does not mean they are unhealthy.

Take me for instance I am 110 pounds over my ideal weight. I am also 6-foot-tall and have stage three thyroid cancer. Would I love to be 100 pounds lighter yes! I work out every day, I try to eat healthy yet the lowest I have weighed in 10 years is 296.

So next time you decide to judge someone based on their size, I implore you to think first.

For those of us out there that have weight issues I say to you be true to yourself. Admit you have issues and understand some people are meant to be care bears while others are barbies.

Lastly remember no matter what anyone says to you, you are beautiful and be true to you.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The news site of Madison Area Technical College
Reviewing the myths and facts about nation’s obesity crisis